Eight Minutes

Sep 04
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J. M. Ledgard, Literature has the Long Reach

While great journalism speaks essentially to the moment, literature has the long reach. It’s a bit random what survives and what doesn’t, but I think of Turgenev’s “Fathers and Sons”—a mid-nineteenth-century novel from Russia, and it is still so incredibly relevant. So literature really allows for the big themes, and we should take them on. I find it a bit disappointing that so much contemporary novel writing doesn’t. Think about what’s happened in the past twenty years, since the end of the Cold War—the technological revolution, the doubling of the world population, the rise of China, the extinction of thousands of species. I’m not saying that literature should be a polemic. But if literary fiction is reduced to only middle-class families dealing only with middle-class angst, then it’s really finished as a force for grappling with the world. To me, the world is inherently mysterious, even like a fairy tale, sometimes a happy fairy tale, sometimes a very dark one. But that wonderment is what I’m after. —J.M. Ledgard in The New Yorker

Aug 13
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Susan Sontag, What Made Me Be a Writer

What made me be a writer was that I was a passionate reader. I began reading at a very, very early age, and I’ve been a reading junkie ever since — I read all the time. I probably spend more time reading than any other thing I’ve done in my life, including sleeping. I’ve spent many, many days of my life reading eight and ten hours a day, and there’s no day that I don’t read for hours, and don’t ask me how I can do all the other things — I don’t know. The day has pockets — you can always find time to read…

— Via Lifehacker.

Jun 27
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James Baldwin

“The bottom line is this: You write in order to change the world, knowing perfectly well that you probably can’t, but also knowing that literature is indispensable to the world. The world changes according to the way people see it, and if you alter, even by a millimeter, the way people look at reality, then you can change it….If there is no moral question, there is no reason to write. I’m an old-fashioned writer and, despite the odds, I want to change the world. ” — James Baldwin via Reluctant Habits

Jun 17
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George R.R. Martin on Writing Characters

The process of writing for me comes from a different part of the brain than the rational one. I don’t know if I believe all this right-brain/left-brain stuff, but I don’t sit down and make decisions like, “Yes I need a decision here, I need something there.” I set the characters in motion, I set the story in motion, and they lead me to certain places. Admittedly, sometimes they lead me down a dead end and I go, “This isn’t going to work, I really painted myself in a corner here, I gotta go back and change this.” But sometimes they lead me to very powerful places. Entertainment Weekly

Jun 04
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Lisa Brennan-Jobs: Favorite Moment of the Day

Sometimes I go to sleep thinking of the next morning’s hot coffee in my customary white paper cup. The anticipation makes the sheets seem softer. In my life, I am between landmarks: after childhood, before a book, before marriage and children, all potential. I’ve heard the gambler’s rush isn’t in losing or winning, but the interval between playing and knowing. Coffee is my ritual, my interval, the luminous place between now and what’s next, more arc than landing. It is ubiquitous and legal, solitary and communal. In the morning, when I take a sip, space opens between the molecules; voices and clatter in the café separate into bright, tonal bands. My mind fans open. Fireflies blink in my torso. I take it to go, so I can drink and walk alone in the cool air under the trees on 12th street on my way to work. I savor each sip after the scorch has dissipated, before the cup is loose and lukewarm like a hand in mine.

May 31
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Mona Simpson on Her Writing Space

Instead of a dedicated room, my best trigger is the actual habit of reading over the texts from the day before. Marking. Changing. Fussing. This ritual amounts to a habit of trust. Trust that I can make it better. That if I keep trying, I will come closer to something true.

May 15
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itsaboutinterior:

Heydar Aliyev Center by Zaha Hadid Architects.

itsaboutinterior:

Heydar Aliyev Center by Zaha Hadid Architects.

(Source: fubiz.net)

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An artisanal world (crooked lines, weathered materials, uneven surfaces) is a human world.
— Susan Sontag
Apr 21
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Orhan Pamuk on Writing

I’m happy when I’m alone in a room and inventing. More than a commitment to the art or to the craft, which I am devoted to, it is a commitment to being alone in a room. I continue to have this ritual, believing that what I am doing now will one day be published, legitimizing my daydreams. I need solitary hours at a desk with good paper and a fountain pen like some people need a pill for their health. I am committed to these rituals. 

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Orhan Pamuk

Finally, I think of things for years. I may have ideas and then I tell them to my close friends. I keep lots of notebooks for possible novels I may write. Sometimes I don’t write them, but if I open a notebook and begin taking notes for it, it is likely that I will write that novel. So when I’m finishing one novel my heart may be set on one of these projects; and two months after finishing one I start writing the other. —The Paris Review